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One Crazy Summer



Hoops McCann, a recent high school graduate, fails to get a basketball scholarship, disappointing his parents. He hopes to be admitted to the Rhode Island School of Design, and must write and illustrate a love story for his application. He joins his friends, siblings George and Squid Calamari, to spend the summer on the island of Nantucket, Massachusetts.




One Crazy Summer



With the prize returned and the house spared, Hoops and Cassandra kiss, and she inspires a love story for his application. In the final scene, George's uncle Frank finally wins a $1 million prize from a radio contest (having been driven insane every summer for trying to win), but his phone gets disconnected and his prize is given away to someone else; he snaps and promptly uses a rocket launcher to blow up the radio station, and shortly thereafter the Stork twins arrive and head to the still-burning station to roast marshmallows.


One Crazy Summer is a historical fiction novel by American author Rita Williams-Garcia, published by Amistad in 2010. The novel is about Delphine, Vonetta, and Fern, three sisters, visiting their mother in Oakland, California, during the summer of 1968.[2]


In One Crazy Summer, eleven-year-old Delphine is like a mother to her two younger sisters, Vonetta and Fern. She's had to be, ever since their mother, Cecile, left them seven years ago for a radical new life in California. But when the sisters arrive from Brooklyn to spend the summer with their mother, Cecile is nothing like they imagined.


While the girls hope to go to Disneyland and meet Tinker Bell, their mother sends them to a day camp run by the Black Panthers. Unexpectedly, Delphine, Vonetta, and Fern learn much about their family, their country, and themselves during one truly crazy summer.


In this Newbery Honor novel, New York Times bestselling author Rita Williams-Garcia tells the story of three sisters who travel to Oakland, California, in 1968 to meet the mother who abandoned them. A strong option for summer reading--take this book along on a family road trip or enjoy it at home.


Eleven-year-old Delphine has it together. Even though her mother, Cecile, abandoned her and her younger sisters, Vonetta and Fern, seven years ago. Even though her father and Big Ma will send them from Brooklyn to Oakland, California, to stay with Cecile for the summer. And even though Delphine will have to take care of her sisters, as usual, and learn the truth about the missing pieces of the past.


When the girls arrive in Oakland in the summer of 1968, Cecile wants nothing to do with them. She makes them eat Chinese takeout dinners, forbids them to enter her kitchen, and never explains the strange visitors with Afros and black berets who knock on her door. Rather than spend time with them, Cecile sends Delphine, Vonetta, and Fern to a summer camp sponsored by a revolutionary group, the Black Panthers, where the girls get a radical new education.


Summer of 1968. 11 year-old Delphine is the oldest of three sisters and has taken upon herself to take care of her younger siblings Vonetta and Fern ever since their mother Cecile left 7 years ago (just after Fern was born). She does so with aplomb, knowing each sister really well and keeping it together in a responsible, mature way. Which is why she is not really that worried when her father decides to send them across America to meet their mother and stay over the summer holidays. What could possibly go wrong? Worst case scenario, Cecile is really just the distant, crazy person their grandmother always told them about, right?


The story opens with Delphine, Vonetta (age 9), and Fern (age 7) taking an airplane to fly out to see their mother in Oakland, California. This isn't a regular visit, however. Their mother abandoned them right after Fern was born and has been living in California as a poet. Delphine's father believes it is time for the girls to get to know their mother and they are set to spend one month of the summer with her. Big Ma does not agree this is a good idea. She is worried that Oakland is full of racial unrest and doesn't trust Cecile, the girls' mother, because she has never forgiven her for leaving the family.


When the girls arrive, their fears are confirmed. Cecile, or Nzila as she has renamed herself, is harsh and outwardly says she did not request this visit. She prefers her quiet life of writing poetry and is not cut out to care for three girls. She forces the girls to fend for themselves most of the time. They quickly learn how to navigate their way around the city. They go to the People's Center summer camp run by the Black Panthers every day and every evening, they buy Chinese food for dinner. Eventually, they go grocery shopping themselves, and Delphine cooks the meal.


This book tells the story of three sisters who travel to Oakland, California, in 1968 to meet the mother who abandoned them. Eleven-year-old Delphine is like a mother to her two younger sisters, Vonetta and Fern. She's had to be, ever since their mother, Cecile, left them seven years ago for a radical new life in California. When they arrive from Brooklyn to spend the summer with her, Cecile is nothing like they imagined. While the girls hope to go to Disneyland and meet Tinker Bell, their mother sends them to a day camp run by the Black Panthers. Unexpectedly, Delphine, Vonetta, and Fern learn much about their family, their country, and themselves during one truly crazy summer.


I read this book because it was on my summer reading list, and I think it's an amazing book. I can relate to it because it is similar to what is currently happening in the world right now, with George Floyd. This is an awesome book!!!


Before Josh and Jordan Bell were streaking up and down the court, their father was learning his own moves. In this prequel to Newbery Medal winner The Crossover, Chuck Bell takes center stage, as listeners get a glimpse of his childhood and how he became the jazz music worshiping basketball star his sons look up to. A novel in verse with all the impact and rhythm listeners have come to expect from Kwame Alexander, Rebound will go back in time to visit the childhood of Chuck "Da Man" Bell during one pivotal summer when young Charlie is sent to stay with his grandparents, where he discovers basketball and learns more about his family's past.


Not quite as sharp or strong as John Cusack and Savage Steve Holland's previous feature "Better Off Dead", but "One Crazy Summer" is still a really easy film to watch that's actually pretty enjoyable. The laughs definitely aren't as consistent as I would've liked but the wacky and zany humor still offers plenty of fun gags and John Cusack just makes for such a sympathetic lead. Definitely makes me ready for summer too.


I'm pretty impressed just how many different cliches Holland is able to subvert and bits he maintains while telling seemingly standard examples of the genre. From high school ski movie to summer vacation flick, goofball romantic comedies with too many side gags to get tired of any one of them.


What's great about these 80s gems is that no matter how crazy or fantastic they get, they still feel like they could be real life back then - a time with no cell phones or social media, and we had to be super inventive in making our own fun. Like if you made an effort in the real world, these fun times could be yours too.


In the summer of 1968, after travelling from Brooklyn to Oakland, California, to spend a month with the mother they barely know, eleven-year-old Delphine and her two younger sisters arrive to a cold welcome as they discover that their mother, a dedicated poet and printer, is resentful of the intrusion of their visit and wants them to attend a nearby Black Panther summer camp.


In this unit, students explore the meaning of family, community, and identity by reading the core text One Crazy Summer. Through the eyes of eleven-year-old Delphine, readers experience life in Oakland, California, in 1968, the height of the Black Panther movement. Delphine and her two younger sisters, Vonetta and Fern, spend a summer in Oakland visiting their estranged mother who sends them to spend their days at a camp run by the Black Panthers. Throughout the summer, the girls learn about what it means to be part of a revolution, what the Black Panther Party was fighting for, and why the Black Panther Party was important during this time period. Through it all, they build confidence in themselves and their relationships with others as they learn to challenge and respond to social issues in the community. It is our hope that this unit, in conjunction with others in the series, will help students understand the way experiences shape our identities and beliefs, and how children can help bring about change in the community.


Pappas is among many advisors who battled a number of roadblocks -- a labor shortage and flight cancellations among them -- just getting their clients to Europe this summer and are now turning to the festive season and summer 2023, which they say already looks like another strong year.


The labor shortage also impacted availability. Some destination management companies told travel advisors that they weren't accepting new bookings for some months in the summer because they couldn't handle additional volume.


Pappas is already getting inquiries for summer 2023 travel to Europe, which is early for her. Typically, she starts getting those requests in January. Some of the clients booking now were ones who said they were priced out this summer, she said. 041b061a72


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