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Search & Rescue: Vietnam Med Evac Download (2002 Simulation Game)



While the search aspect requires learning to fly the Huey by mastering flight instruments such as attitude director and airspeed indicators, radar and barometric altimeters, vertical speed indicators, and the horizontal situation video display (among others), the rescue phase involves an entirely different set of tasks. Selecting the correct tools for the job at hand, such as the sling, litter, hoist, or basket, plays an important role, as does manning the helicopter's machinegun, spotlights, flares, and lights. In addition to the pilot, flight crews include a flight mechanic, rescue swimmer, and gunner.




search and rescue vietnam medevac full download


Download: https://www.google.com/url?q=https%3A%2F%2Fjinyurl.com%2F2u1Zve&sa=D&sntz=1&usg=AOvVaw3xXS7bzdJ3IPgiGuvlA-nH



It is a classic war flight simulation game which is the successor to the original versions which also made a huge impact. The plot in the game is that you will be given controls to the H1 helicopter which you will fly into the core or the midst of Vietnam where all the war is going ones as the name suggests, you have to do a variety of search and rescue missions which will make you counter a lot of enemies and obstacles. The game is not a typical shooting action only as you also have to search out your goal for rescuing people in various diverse missions. The flight dynamics or the flight physics are great as you get a complete control over the helicopter that can move in all directions. The gaming engine of this simulation has been very effecting in portraying all the details and is great in all aspects of the play. Coming towards the graphics, they are by no means average or ordinary and really give you an indulging experience throughout the course of it. The variety of ammo, power ups o the weapons is great and is really destructive.


In 1971, Army Spc. 5 Dennis M. Fujii spent five grueling days fending off enemy fighters after his medevac helicopter crashed during a rescue attempt in Laos. During that time, he took care of wounded South Vietnamese soldiers and found a way for U.S. air support to successfully extract him. Fujii recently received the Medal of Honor for those actions, more than 50 years after the ordeal made him a hero.


About 45 minutes later, another U.S. helicopter successfully landed near the wreckage of the first. Fujii and the survivors of the medevac ran toward it, but Fujii was again hit by shrapnel, this time in the eye. By the time he'd reoriented himself, the intense enemy fire had been redirected at him.


By Feb. 20, Fujii was exhausted and in pain, but he continued to bear the responsibility for the surrounded South Vietnamese troops until another helicopter successfully rescued him. That medevac, however, was also shot up and forced to crash-land at another South Vietnamese encampment about two miles away.


In 1915, during the First World War, Squadron Commander Richard Bell-Davies of the British Royal Naval Air Service performed the first combat search and rescue by aircraft in history. He used his single-seat aeroplane to rescue his wingman who had been shot down in Bulgaria. His Victoria Cross citation included "Squadron-Commander Davies descended at a safe distance from the burning machine, took up Sub-Lieutenant Smylie, in spite of the near approach of a party of the enemy, and returned to the aerodrome, a feat of airmanship that can seldom have been equalled for skill and gallantry."[4] Like the search and rescue efforts of the future, Davies' action sprang from the fervent desire to keep a compatriot from capture or death at the hands of the enemy.[citation needed]


It was during the Mesopotamian campaign that British and other Commonwealth forces began to use similar tactics on a larger scale. Shot down aviators in hostile Bedouin territory were often located by search parties in the air and rescued.[5]


During the Vietnam War the costly rescue of Bat 21 led the US military to find a new approach to high-threat search and rescue. They recognized that if a SAR mission was predestined to fail, it should not be attempted and other options such as special operations, diversionary tactics and other creative approaches tailored to the situation had to be considered. Recognizing the need for an aircraft that could deliver better close air support, the US Air Force introduced the A-7 Corsair, originally a carrier-based Navy light attack aircraft, to replace the Air Force's A-1 Skyraiders, an aircraft that also was originally a carrier-based naval attack bomber.[citation needed]


In 1972, Lieutenant Colonel Iceal Hambleton, a navigator/electronic warfare officer with a background in ballistic missile technology and missile countermeasures in the US Air Force, was the sole survivor of an EB-66 shot down during the Easter Offensive. He eluded capture by North Vietnamese forces until his rescue, eleven-and-a-half days later. During the rescue operation, five US military aircraft supporting the CSAR effort were shot down, eleven US servicemen were killed, and two men were captured. The rescue operation was the "largest, longest, and most complex search-and-rescue" operation during the entire Vietnam War.[11] It has been the subject of two books and the largely fictionalized film Bat*21.[12]


In 1999, members of United States Air Force Pararescue along with Air Force Special Operations recovery aircraft successfully rescued the pilot of an F-117 "stealth" attack aircraft (see 1999 F-117A shootdown) and also the pilot (David L. Goldfein) of an F-16 fighter, aircraft. Both of the aircraft were shot down over Yugoslavia while on a NATO-led mission.[17]


The Airman's Creed says, "I will never leave an Airman behind." True to their creed, pilots with the 134th Fighter Squadron, 158th Fighter Wing, Vermont Air National Guard, conducted training focused on recovering downed pilots. The Airmen trained in search and rescue operations in Vermont and New York for two weeks, finishing the exercises April 29, 2016.


"We supported the Air Guard with their search and rescue training by providing them with a lift asset to drop them off and pick them up, and they escorted us in," said Chief Warrant Officer 2 Aaron Mongeon, a Black Hawk pilot, C/3-126th AVN (AA). An F-16 communicates with the pilot on the ground and provides aerial support while the other F-16 escorts the helicopter into the area while looking for threats to the helicopter, said Capt. Phil Francis, F-16 pilot, 134th FS, 158th FW.


Every year, nearly 2,000 people are reported as lost in the wilderness across the United States. Most are found with small, local-run search and rescue operations. Occasionally these become more involved, turning into multi-day events that call up a variety of local resources.


The 1-230th AHB is often called upon to assist both state and federal parks with retrieval of injured hikers. With the Great Smoky Mountain National Park alone welcoming over 14 million visitors annually, the availability of the Tennessee National Guard to assist with search, rescue, and retrieval, can mean the difference between life and death for outdoor enthusiasts who find themselves in dangerous situations.


An HH-53 Huskie, a specialized helicopter designed for search and rescue, of the 40th Aerospace Rescue and Recovery Squadron as seen from the gunner's position, in Vietnam, October 1972. (U.S. Air Force photo by Ken Hackman)


NELLIS AIR FORCE BASE, Nev. -- The official party enters a memorial ceremony for 1st Lt. Joel Gentz, 25, a combat rescue officer assigned to the 58th Rescue Squadron; and Staff Sgt. David Smith, 26, a helicopter flight engineer assigned to the 66th Rescue Squadron at Nellis Air Force Base June 18. The two were among four Airmen killed and three wounded when an HH-60G Pave Hawk helicopter crashed during a medevac mission in southeastern Afghanistan June 9. (U.S. Air Force Photo / Lawrence Crespo)


NELLIS AIR FORCE BASE, Nev. -- Follow U.S. Air Force pararescuemen pay their final respects to 1st Lt. Joel Gentz, 25, a combat rescue officer assigned to the 58th Rescue Squadron; and Staff Sgt. David Smith, 26, a helicopter flight engineer assigned to the 66th Rescue Squadron during a memorial ceremony at Nellis Air Force Base June 18. The two were among four Airmen killed and three wounded when an HH-60G Pave Hawk helicopter crashed during a medevac mission in southeastern Afghanistan June 9. (U.S. Air Force Photo / Lawrence Crespo)


NELLIS AIR FORCE BASE, Nev. -- Senior Airman Joshua Degenhardt, pararescueman pays his final respect to 1st Lt. Joel Gentz, 25, a combat rescue officer assigned to the 58th Rescue Squadron a memorial ceremony at Nellis Air Force Base June 18. 1st Lt. Gentz was among four Airmen killed when his HH-60G Pave Hawk helicopter crashed during a medevac mission in southeastern Afghanistan June 9. (U.S. Air Force Photo / Lawrence Crespo)


NELLIS AIR FORCE BASE, Nev. -- Senior Airman Anthony Berardocco plays taps during a memorial ceremony for 1st Lt. Joel Gentz, 25, a combat rescue officer assigned to the 58th Rescue Squadron; and Staff Sgt. David Smith, 26, a helicopter flight engineer assigned to the 66th Rescue Squadron at Nellis Air Force Base June 18. The two were among four Airmen killed and three wounded when an HH-60G Pave Hawk helicopter crashed during a medevac mission in southeastern Afghanistan June 9. (U.S. Air Force Photo / Airman 1st Class Jamie Nicley)


NELLIS AIR FORCE BASE, Nev. -- The Nellis Honor Guard performs a 21 gun salute during a memorial service for 1st Lt. Joel Gentz, 25, a combat rescue officer assigned to the 58th Rescue Squadron; and Staff Sgt. David Smith, 26, a helicopter flight engineer assigned to the 66th Rescue Squadron during a memorial ceremony at Nellis Air Force Base June 18. The two were among four Airmen killed and three wounded when an HH-60G Pave Hawk helicopter crashed during a medevac mission in southeastern Afghanistan June 9. (U.S. Air Force Photo / Lawrence Crespo)


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